NLP for Poor Spelling, Difficult Reading, Slow Math

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-12-2015

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How can NLP help with poor spelling, difficult reading, and slow math all in one?
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NLP Help With Writing and Math

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-04-2013

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The problem:

“When writing, I can’t seem to say what I’d like to… And when I go to my math class, when the teaching assistant is there, she explains all to me. But when she isn’t there, I don’t understand the teacher. Then I just start drawing and get told off.  I learn well through colors, so what I tried to do is instead of writing with black ink I used coloring pens.  It really works.  But I get really stressed in my class when the girls [my classmates] shout and argue.”

The solution:

When writing you can’t seem to say what you’d like to because you currently don’t visualise the content of what you want to say.  Unless you see a clear picture of the story you want to write, words will be volatile and quickly escape your memory.  Visualize the content of what you want to say. Then write it.  Once you have the picture in your head, you’ll see all its details and be able to write about them well and without getting distracted.  Use your work with colors. Add color to all the places, objects, and people in your imagination that you want to write about. Your brain will get it very quickly.

Exactly the same principle applies to math:

when the teaching assistant or teacher is explaining, visualise as much of what she’s saying as you can.  Is she talking  about numbers?  Do you know what a number 2 looks like written down?  If yes, then you can visualise numbers.  Is she talking about symbols like + – x : = < > or fractions?  If no, listen to her and write as much as you can.  Writing math on paper is a prerequisite for visualizing it.

Use your colors while writing on paper and mentally visualizing.  They’ll help you.  At present you’re easily distractible, because you know you’re not getting it and so you resign every time you start drawing and go off the course of the lesson.  Learn to visualise what the teacher is explaining.  Then you’ll start understanding math better and faster.  Once you reach this stage, you will be more focused and the girls arguing in class won’t sway your attention.

Learn to keep both feet firmly on the ground while you’re sitting in class, listening, and visualising the content of what your teachers are explaining.  Grounding is an essential skill. You can learn it very quickly and master it with patience and practice!

Could I help you or anyone you know with writing and math?  Let’s talk about it.

5 NLP Tips for Legal Professionals With(out) Learning Difficulties

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-06-2017

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Can lawyers and legal professionals with learning difficulties get help without incurring too much cost in time, money, and energy?  If yes, how can NLP help?   Read the rest of this entry »

Reading and Language Delay in an Autistic Child

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-12-2016

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Albeit I’m not an expert in working with autistic people. I did help one parent of an autistic child with his reading and language delay. Here’s how.
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NLP for Financial Professionals in Retail Banking

Filed Under (NLP coaching for retail) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-03-2016

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How can financial professionals in retail banking use NLP to be credible, trustworthy, and different? If you are or know a financial services representative or financial advisor in retail banking or an independent financial professional, you or that person can make a big difference with these simple NLP tricks.  Read the rest of this entry »

NLP to Stop Poor Literacy and Numeracy

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-06-2015

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Poor literacy and numeracy is the number one reason why young people quit school. And the number one block to them being ready for employment after leaving school.  This trend is easy to change as more people understand how our fabulously talented visual children and adults operate.  How can you help stop poor literacy and numeracy with NLP? Read the rest of this entry »

How Reading, Writing, Spelling Difficulties Are Connected

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-04-2015

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If everything is connected in life, how are reading, writing, spelling difficulties connected? Read this frustrated parent’s query, and you may find answers to the difficulties of that special someone you know.  Read the rest of this entry »

NLP for Difficulties With Reading

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-12-2013

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How can NLP help people who have difficulties with reading?  Read the rest of this entry »

NLP for Help With Dyslexia

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-04-2012

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How can NLP help dyslexia? Here are 3 questions a woman in Australia had asked me.  I hope my answers will benefit you. Read the rest of this entry »

NLP Tips for Literacy Teachers of Primary Schoolchildren

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-04-2011

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How can you help STOP DYSLEXIA NOW?

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NLP coaching for learning difficulties

Filed Under () by NLP-Life-Coach on 20-01-2011

How do learning difficulties begin?

Everyone visualizes / imagines / sees pictures in their heads. When you were 6 weeks young,  you started smiling at your mother. You matched a picture in your head with the picture of the person looking at you. You might also recognise her voice or smell, but if she put on a wig, you would cry! Blind people visualize too.  Vision and visualization are different things!

If your friend walked into the room now, would you recognize him/her?  Now imagine the friend with pink hair.  Did you change your picture?  Now imagine that you are watching a car driving up to the red traffic light. See it stopping.  Watch the movie in reverse. By the way, what colour was the car?

This is how you control the pictures that you imagine. You are born with this skill.  But sometimes a person gets stressed, the brain gets confused, and loses this skill or starts applying it wrongly.  And that’s how learning difficulties begin.

Every person who does not have learning difficulties sees pictures in his/her imagination

  • easily, sharply, clearly
  • far enough to be comfortable, yet near enough to be easy to see
  • as movies or as still pictures, whichever s/he needs at a given moment.

Where and when is visualising essential?

  • A hairstylist imagines a finished haircut.
  • A taxi driver must picture where s/he is going.
  • A double glazer, construction worker, or carpenter imagines the finished item.
  • An architect imagines the finished building and then draws the plans.
  • An artist imagines what s/he is creating.
  • A surveyor must see whether the building matches the plans.
  • A student visualizes mind maps, sequences, formulae, equations, materials for revisions and exams.
  • A healer sees the blocks in the energy lines in the body.
  • A good speller imagines a written word before s/he spells it!
  • A person excellent at math imagines the mathematical progressions and draws results,
  • …hence seeing numbers is an essential skill for mathematics.
  • A salesperson visualizes the concept s/he is selling and then describes it.

To spell,read, and count well you need to see still words and numbers.

Fluent readers store pictures of whole words in their brains. You also need to be able to do it in order to spell easily. Most people develop the skill of storing whole words and groups of numbers in their brains naturally. But some people don’t. And the confusion leads to literacy and numeracy learning difficulties.  The harder they try, the more confused they are, and the letters and numbers may start moving around the page.

If you find spelling and reading easy, try this:

  • Do you see words in your imagination?
  • Where in your visual field are they?  High, low, on the right or left?
  • See the word cat.  If this is easy, try balloon.  Was this easy? Try sophisticated.

If you’re good at spelling and reading, this exercise will probably be easy.  You see the letters and spell the words.  This is how it should be.  It works in any language at any age. But if you cannot visualise words like this, you will probably find spelling and reading difficult.  If you have dyslexia, the letters may be moving, having a party!  Just imagine stopping them – like the car that you imagined stopping for a red traffic light.

If you have difficulties with learning literacy,

the skill of visualising words is very easy to learn.  It is highly likely that no teacher taught you this at school.  Even today teachers at schools and educational institutions still do not understand how people’s brains work.  This is because anyone can apply for a teaching job, but not everyone will study the works of the brain before or after they get the job!  But nowadays anyone can learn how our brains work at any age in any language in minutes.  People who struggle with literacy learning difficulties are immensely visual, but are often stuck in the mode of moving pictures.

Similarly, imagine the number 21.  Check that you see the number still, just like you did the cat, balloon, or sophisticated.

If you find visualising numbers easy,

  • add the numbers 21 and 24.  Do you see them in your head as if they were in a photograph?  What’s the result of the two added numbers?
  • how would you organize a phone number into 3 or 4 chunks of 2 or 3 digits to remember it?
  • to remember a PIN, see the group of its numbers as if it was in a photograph. Or see the order in which you press the PIN’s keys on a keypad
  • to remember start times of meetings visualize the digital time, e.g. 12:30 on the face of a digital or analog clock

If you find visualising numbers difficult,

  • try visualizing the number 2. If that’s difficult, see 2 eggs.  Then see the word eggs.
  • if you like text messaging, imagine nice 2 c u or c u l8r. When you can see that, you can visualize numbers.
  • if you have used an abacus, play with visualizing the beads when you want to add up.

Why do the numbers that we use in the Western world have the shapes they have? Because they are derived from the Phoenician numerals which denoted the number of angles corresponding to the written number.  Hence the shape of the number 1 had one angle. The shape of the number 2 had two angles, and similarly the shape of the number 9 had 9 angles.

NLP coaching for learning difficulties will certainly benefit you if you:

  • are a parent who can’t get help for a child with learning difficulties from the school, educational psychologist, local educational authority, etc.
  • family member, friend, or acquaintance of someone with learning difficulties
  • teacher, mentor, tutor, educational support worker, educator who wants to more efficiently work with students with learning difficulties
  • professional or entrepreneur in any field who is too busy or maybe embarrassed to get help for learning difficulties
  • highly or averagely intelligent
  • (probably) have several learning difficulties
  • do not have severe intellectual, emotional, behavioural, nor thinking disorders
  • do not have brain injury nor autism
  • are of any age and speak any languages.

You can get NLP coaching for learning difficulties with:

  • spelling – poor, irregular, none, reversing letters [d-b, p-q, a-e, c-o], reversing syllables [ae-ea, ei-ie]
  • reading – slow, erratic, poorly recognizing words, hence misreading or reading with frequent errors
  • reading comprehension – you find it difficult to remember what you read
  • writing – messy, unable to copy things to paper, writing with frequent errors, difficult or unable to draw
  • numbers – maths, visualizing or remembering numbers, difficulty with mathematical reasoning, reading analog clocks, breaking down steps in mathematical procedures, and also poorly managing time
  • dyslexia
  • dyscalculia = numerical version of dyslexia
  • visual memory – you have difficulty with directing and organizing your learning, remembering symbols, patterns, mathematical or chemical equations, names of people / places / colours / animals / objects / days / abstract phenomena, geographical orientation, finding objects, losing objects, remembering visual cues – landmarks / faces / details of pictures, often getting lost / disoriented, difficulty with constructing geometrical figures

sound / hearing

  • sound [hearing] memory – you have difficulty remembering spoken instructions, following lectures / long conversations, hence difficulty gaining information from listening, mishearing words [therefore misinterpreting information], understanding foreign accents, extra effort required to listen to speech
  • processing sound – speech rambling, difficulty explaining in own words, using internal voice to work out consequences, speaking in incomplete sentences, difficulty following long sentences, flat / monotonous speech without rhythm and intonation, mispronouncing words, avoiding using words because of uncertainty how to pronounce them, difficulty learning foreign languages, difficulty with thinking and speaking at the same time, slurring speech / lack of articulation
  • attention – difficulty keeping attention to a task
  • difficulty interpreting information such as body language / facial expressions / voice tone, weak social skills, difficulty noticing and interpreting emotions, understanding the correct sequence of steps in a task: cooking, sowing, computer programming

physical / feeling / bodily

  • physical [bodily] perception – awkward / clumsy movements, poor muscle tone resulting in slow / awkward movements, bumping into objects due to not knowing where the body is in space in relation to objects, uneven handwriting with variable pressure, difficulty navigating in the dark, messy / disorganized workspace, difficulty with time signature in music
  • difficulty with logical reasoning, also understanding cause and effect
  • difficulty with thinking / planning / problem solving verbally and nonverbally, seeing the main point / core of things, difficulty with associative memory.

NLP coaching teaches and helps people with learning difficulties to:

  • build and strengthen thinking processes
  • train the visual, hearing, and feeling memory
  • sharpen observational skills and attention to detail
  • develop attention and concentration
  • improve fine motor skills [for writing etc.]
  • speed up processing of information faster, therefore make people more efficient thinkers
  • consequently strengthen executive functions
  • build capacity for thinking, reasoning, solving problems
  • at home
  • at school, college, university, educational institution
  • in the community
  • and finally also in the workplace

NLP for Learning Difficulties

Filed Under (NLP learning difficulties) by NLP-Life-Coach on 01-04-2010

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How can NLP [Neuro-Linguistic Programming] help people who have learning difficulties?

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